Tag Archives: teen eating disorders

Males & Eating Disorders: Awareness and Prevention

Sex-choice-000057231114_XXXLarge_blogThe ratio of female to male eating disorders suggest that women and girls are more affected than men: according to the National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA), the female to male ratio for anorexia is 10:1; for bulimia, 10:1; and 2:1 for binge eating disorder. Although eating disorders in females and males are clinically similar, it is feared that the true statistics related to males are not fully known due to underreporting of symptoms and stigma.
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Helping Your Teen with an Eating Disorder

Helping your Teen with an Eating DisorderHelping your Teen with an Eating Disorder

Center for Discovery has been providing specialized eating disorder treatment to teens and adolescents for over 17 years, and we know how challenging recovery can be. Parents often feel helpless and alone as they struggle to find a way to help their child. Thankfully, there are resources available for parents and families who are caring for a young person with an eating disorder. With the right support, families can face the eating disorder together with strength and hope.

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Eating Disorders and Dental Exams

Eating Disorders and Dental ExamsEating Disorders and Dental Exams

Did you know that an eating disorder can be diagnosed from the dental chair? According to the Institute of Dental Research, 28% of bulimia cases are first diagnosed during a visit to the dentist. Our mouths reveal a tremendous amount of information about our overall health. Dentists may be among the first professionals to notice something that is indicative of a more serious issue.

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Parent Support: What to do when your Teen has an Eating Disorder

Center for Discovery has been providing specialized eating disorder treatment to teens and adolescents for over 17 years, and we know how challenging recovery can be. Parents often feel helpless and alone as they struggle to find a way to help their child. Thankfully, there are resources available for parents and families who are caring for a young person with an eating disorder. With the right support, families can face the eating disorder together with strength and hope.

Pelz (n.d.) outlines six ways to survive a teen’s eating disorder, providing guidelines for parents who are trying to navigate this challenging illness:

  1. Don’t blame yourself: There are many reasons why a teen can develop an eating disorder. Family dynamics are not the primary cause.
  2. Learn as much as you can: Eating disorders are mysterious illnesses. Lean on your teen’s treatment team, ask questions, and read up on the latest research. There are also many good books that provide knowledge and support for those caring for a loved one with an eating disorder.
  3. Take stock of family patterns that may be reinforcing the problem: Again, this does not mean blame yourself. Instead, it means that this is a good time to discover what expectations, communication styles, and family perspectives on weight and exercise could be reinforcing the disorder. Family therapy is a safe place to discuss and challenge these dynamics.
  4. You are going to make mistakes: Talking to a teen with an eating disorder can be impossible at times. Keep trying, and practice what you want to say. Sometimes things will come out wrong. Still, keep trying. Recovery is a long process with many opportunities for growth for everyone.
  5. Eating disorder recovery is a marathon, not a sprint: Everyone is different, and therefore everyone’s recovery journey is different. Recovery can take years. It is important for families to pace themselves and take the process one day at a time. Self-care is also very important- take time to take care of you and recharge your body, mind, and soul.
  6. Get support: Take advantage of parent support groups, online forums, individual counseling, books, and family and friends to help get you through this time. Don’t go it alone. There are many, many resources for families and all of them are a beacon of hope.

 

With the right support, families can thrive during the process of a teen’s eating disorder recovery. For more information and to receive valuable support as you care for your teen, please visit Center for Discovery at www.centerfordiscovery.com. There you will find a parent guide, treatment options, and a wealth of information about eating disorders. You may also visit the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA) at www.nationaleatingdisorders.org and download a Parent Toolkit.

 

References:

Pelz, A. (n.d.). 6 ways to survive your teen’s eating disorder. PsychCentral: Learn, Share, Grow. Retrieved from www.psychcentral.com

Taking An Eating Disorder Seriously

Taking an eating disorder seriously Taking an Eating Disorder Seriously

It may not seem like eating disorder behavior is something that you should take seriously at first. Your adolescent may claim to want to lose some weight, or that they are eating someplace else, not at home. There are plenty of excuses that may allow you and your teen to pass it off as nothing, until the eating disorder behavior becomes a serious threat to your teen’s health and well-being.

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Over-involvement in the Kitchen

Over-involvement in the KitchenCan Over-involvement in the Kitchen Be a Warning Sign?

Imagine having a fear of heights. Also imagine that you are blindfolded and led to a platform which will raise you to an unspecified height. Imagine that you aren’t sure how far off the ground you are or how long you must stay on the platform. In fact, every piece of knowledge which would help calm your fears is kept secret from you.

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Trends in Eating Disorders & Eating Disorder Treatment

Trends in Eating DisordersWhat Are the Latest Trends in Eating Disorders

Although eating disorders diagnosis is nothing new, new trends are developing within the eating disorder community. Two of these trends include the rise of eating disorders among men and the rise of eating disorders in younger children. According to Huffington (2013), “ A study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal in January 2013 found that eating disorders — once considered the domain of young, white, privileged females — are increasingly affecting males, with research indicating that 10 to 15 percent of people who suffer from anorexia or bulimia are male.”

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Help for Eating Disorders – When You need to Seek Help for your Child

help for eating disordersHelp For Eating Disorders

No parent wants to believe that their child is suffering or that they have an eating disorder. Often times, it can be incredibly difficult to recognize the earliest signs that your child is in trouble. If you believe your teen or adolescent is showing signs of eating disorder behavior, it is important to understand the seriousness of eating disorders. Eating disorders are serious illnesses that can be life threatening and require specialized treatment for recovery. Helping your child begins with recognizing that there is a problem and then seeking the appropriate professional treatment.

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The Threat of “Thinspiration”

The Threat of ThinspirationWhat is The Threat of Thinspiration About

In today’s society, many people especially young girls are bombarded with messages through the media on how they should look and feel about their bodies. Because teens make up an ideal target customer base for marketers, a significant amount of the media is targeted at young women. These images can create tremendous stress on an individual and as well as influence self-esteem and body image.

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A New Wave of Bullying

A New Wave of BullyingA New Wave of Bullying

Bullying, which is different from simple conflict, is characterized by an intention to harm, repeated acts of harm and an imbalance of power between the bully and victim. Bullying has changed over the past 50 years. It’s no longer as simple as getting pushed around at the playground during recess. Access to social media like Facebook, smart phones, iPads, and other advanced technology extends the parameters of bullying into a cyber space that is not only poorly monitored, but has also proven difficult to police or censor. Teenagers are so technologically connected that one word, insult, or picture can be spread to hundreds of peers in moments.

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