Tag Archives: anorexia nervosa

Weekly Top Eating Disorder News Articles

Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are recognized by psychologists and psychiatrists around the world and can result in severe co-morbidities and even death if left untreated. With the continued social stigma attached to eating disorders and in general, mental health disorders; often times it can be challenging to discern the truth from fiction. New innovations in treatment are continuously being published however the mainstream media often does not shed light on these important findings. Below are three published articles that had eating disorders professionals talking this week.

Continue reading

Weekly Top Eating Disorder News Articles

Eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are recognized by psychologists and psychiatrists around the world and can result in severe co-morbidities and even death if left untreated. With the continued social stigma attached to eating disorders and in general, mental health disorders; often times it can be challenging to discern the truth from fiction. New innovations in treatment and new insights on eating disorders are continuously being published however the mainstream media often does not shed light on these important findings. Below are three published articles that had eating disorders professionals talking this week.

Continue reading

Missouri leading legislative reform for eating disorder treatment

Plate with tomatosoup and cream (shape of Missouri)Missouri has become the first state in the nation to expound on the types of eating disorder treatment that insurance companies must cover. The law, championed by eating disorder advocates and signed by Governor Jay Nixon in June, will go into effect in August of 2015. This critical measure will help to ensure that eating disorder patients receive coverage for the treatment necessary to enter into and maintain recovery.

Continue reading

Who is Ana?

 

The Internet has changed how we access information.  It can be gathered more quickly and easily than in days past.  Unfortunately, the Internet can also be a breeding group for destructive information.  One of the types of destructive information found on the Internet is how to act on and conceal eating disorder behavior. 

            “Ana” has become a way to refer to Anorexia and “Mia” to Bulimia on websites known as “pro-ana” or “pro-mia” websites.  These Internet pages usually list tips for maintaining an eating disorder such as cutting calories and dealing with hunger, for instance.  Additionally, many suggest eating behavior that can be classified as an eating ritual, or a way of eating food which lessens the stress of eating.  Tips for how to conceal weight loss from concerned parties may also be found. 

            Additionally, pictures of thin celebrities are posted and are known as “thinspiration,” pictures of underweight or extremely thin body types which become goals.  Most of these sites also contain message boards in which those with eating disorders can obtain “support” for their lifestyle.  Many of these message board administrators claim that eating disorders, especially anorexia, are a lifestyle choice and can be lived out in a “healthy “way. 

            Ana and Mia are symbolic of the identity that some clients find in their eating disorder.  Thinking of the presence of an eating disorder in this way causes issues because it is difficult to think of how one would recover from an identity or a lifestyle.  These online communities offer support for the “stigma” against this chosen way of living and serve as roadblocks to recovery. 

            What can be done about the type of thinking put forth by these websites?  First, we must accept that this type of information exists and is unlikely to go away due to the free-speech aspect of the Internet.  Internet blocks can be installed if this type of Internet usage is suspected.

            Second, what we can do is be aware of these sites and aware of the fact that anorexia or bulimia may be seen as a way or life or an identity by certain clients.  Acknowledging this allows us to approach those we care about or care for in a way that is closer to how they approach the issue, which may foster communication. 

            Third, these sites tend to provide community and support for their visitors. However, this support is supporting a destructive lifestyle.  All people seek community, but the type of community provided is important.  Help the person to find a support group focused on recovery and which may help to separate the identity of Ana from their own identity.  Foster the activities that they wish to do which are different from the things that Ana wishes to do such as going to college, freely spending time with friends or gaining back time that is not focused on food.  Instead of asking “Who is Ana?” we can hope that they will begin to ask “Who am I?”

 

References
Fox, N., Ward, K., & O’Rourke, A. (2005). Pro-anorexia, weight-loss drugs and the internet: An ‘anti-recovery’ explanatory model of anorexia. Sociology of Health & Illness, 27(7), 944-  971. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9566.2005.00465.x
Gavin, J., Rodham, K., & Poyer, H. (2008). The presentation of “Pro-anorexia” in online group     interactions. Qualitative Health Research, 18(3), 325-333.            doi:10.1177/1049732307311640

by at .